Perspectives: Buyer Fatigue

Buyer fatigue. It’s a very real thing and we’re seeing it in cities all up and down the West Coast. What’s causing it? Intensely competitive market conditions in which bidding wars and properties selling for significantly more than asking price are the norm. It’s tiring for buyers. It’s tiring for agents. And it’s emotionally draining when you continue to find, and then lose, the perfect home over and over again.

We recently received a letter from a buyer detailing their experience of bidding on and losing home after home. Eventually they were successful but they wanted us to know that they couldn’t have done it without their agent. Not just the winning offer, but the grueling process it took to get there. They felt that their agent provided the perfect balance of emotional support and professional expertise that they needed to stick with it and eventually find a great home.

For us, this really underscored the importance of having a well-trained agent who not only understands how to compete in a seller’s market, but also truly cares about their clients and the outcome. This market isn’t for the faint of heart, so to be successful you have to be determined yet patient, and you need an agent who will put together specific strategies to help you achieve your goals. It requires total transparency and, at times, brutal honesty.

We wish we could tell you that we’re going to return to a balanced market by the end of the year, but unfortunately that’s highly unlikely. So, if you’re already out there, stay strong. There’s a lot of pressure to overpay for homes right now, so be sure to consult with your agent about the best course of action for your situation. If you’re thinking about jumping in, we can’t stress enough how important it is to work with an agent who will help you successfully navigate the rough waters of this unpredictable housing market.

 

 

5 Tips to Improve Indoor-Outdoor Flow

Wouldn’t you love to double the size of your house for the holidays, or when you’re entertaining a large groups of friends? And when the party is over and all the guests have gone home, have your nice, cozy house back just like that?

It doesn’t make sense to maintain a large entertaining space that gets used only a couple of times a year. That’s why it’s so practical to have a functional and efficient indoor-outdoor space.

Modern Outdoor Spaces: Blurring the Lines Between Indoors and Outdoors

Having a well-designed outdoor area adjacent to your main entertaining rooms is a great way to get more space when needed and to add value to your home. The indoor-outdoor concept is not a new idea, but when you combine it with an open floor plan, you can create a large entertaining area that your guests will savor.

Here are some tips to make sure you get the most out of your indoor-outdoor design.

Dawna Jones Design, original photo on Houzz

 

Create a big opening. Don’t be afraid to invest in big openings between your indoor and outdoor spaces. Large pocket or accordion doors are a great way to blur the visual barriers between the two areas. When weather permits, you can open up the exterior wall and instantly double the floor space.

IndoorOutdoor 2: Giulietti Schouten Architects, original photo on Houzz

 

Keep it covered. It’s always best to have a combination of covered and uncovered outdoor spaces — but be sure to provide a covered entertaining area if at all possible. Essentially, you’ll be creating a series of outdoor rooms that will give you a sense of place without taking away from the fact that you’re outdoors.

Browse Thousands of Outdoor Umbrellas

 

JMA (Jim Murphy and Associates), original photo on Houzz

 

Make it level. The goal is to remove any visual or physical barriers between the two spaces — including any changes in floor level. Making sure your indoor and outdoor spaces are on the same plane assures they’ll function as one space when needed.

 

IndoorOutdoor 4: Horst Architects, original photo on Houzz

 

Create floor flow. Choosing a flooring material that works well inside and out is another great way to make the two spaces feel connected.

Hire a Flooring Professional

 

Take advantage of the view. There is nothing more impressive than a large, open space that takes advantage of an incredible view. Make sure you orient your interior to look at the vista through the adjacent outdoor space. This way you’ll get to enjoy the view from both inside and outside the house.

The truth is, great design is less about the way your house looks (although it should look remarkable), and more about how it functions. A well-designed house will work better, cost less to build, be more efficient to run and maintain, and get you more for less.

 

IndoorOutdoor 5: GM Construction, Inc., original photo on Houzz

 

Great design doesn’t cost more to build than good design, but it sure feels a million times better to live in.

 

By Dylan Chappell, Houzz

 

Announcing the Winner of the 2016 Windermere Real Estate Community Service Day Photo Contest!

On Friday, June 3, Windermere offices across the states of Washington, Oregon, Idaho, Montana, Hawaii, Alaska, Utah, California, Colorado, Nevada, and Arizona, all took a day off from selling homes to help make a difference in their local communities. 

We challenged our offices to share their community service day photos on Windermere’s CSD contest Facebook page, in order to participate in our fourth-annual voter-driven photo contest. More than 40 offices shared photos, and in turn, they each received a $100 donation to the Windermere Foundation charity of their choice.

To add some competition to this challenge, we offered an additional $1,000 charitable contribution to the office with the most votes on their photo. So, who won?

With a total of 578 votes, the winner of the CSD photo contest is Windermere Renton! The team plans to donate their winnings to the Emergency Feeding Program of King County, Washington.  

 

An honorable mention goes to our Windermere Oak Harbor for coming in a close second place whose photo received 566 votes.

 

Thank you to all of our Windermere offices and agents who spent the day giving back to local organizations, community centers, and public spaces throughout the Western U.S.

 

Support Your Local Food Banks During the Summer

Did you know that June is fresh fruits and vegetables month? That’s great if you can afford them. However, they are a luxury for people who struggle to provide even just the basic necessities for their families. Many families rely on their local food banks as a regular supplemental food source. And of those families, 84 percent of households with children report purchasing the cheapest food available, knowing it wasn’t the healthiest option, in order to provide enough food for their family.

And summertime is probably when food banks need your help the most. That’s because children are on break from school and their families have to provide the meals that they normally would get through school meal programs. Six out of seven low-income kids who eat a free or reduced-price school lunch do not get free meals during the summer because they don’t participate in summer meal programs.

So what can you do to help? Does this mean you should go out and buy a bunch of fruits and vegetables to donate to your local food bank? Or maybe donate some extra produce from your home garden? No. The best way that you can help families in need is to donate money to your local food banks. Food banks have agreements or partnerships with distributors/suppliers so that they are able to stretch your donation dollars to purchase more items, usually in bulk. For example, a one-dollar donation—to a food bank hub like Feeding America—can provide 11 meals to families in need. And 68 percent of the foods distributed are healthy foods that align with the USDA Dietary Guidelines.

At Windermere Real Estate, our offices support local food banks through grants from the Windermere Foundation. Here are just a few of the food banks that we have supported over the past year: Idaho Foodbank, Columbia Pacific Food Bank, St. Vincent de Paul Food Bank, Marysville Community Food Bank, The People’s Pantry, Republic, and Maple Valley Food Bank & Emergency Services.

 

 

If you’d like to help, consider making a donation to the Windermere Foundation or donating directly to your local food bank or food pantry.

 

To learn more about the Windermere Foundation, visit http://www.windermere.com/foundation.

 

 

 

Sources:  feedingamerica.org, nokidhungry.org

Support Your Local Food Banks During the Summer

Did you know that June is fresh fruits and vegetables month? That’s great if you can afford them. However, they are a luxury for people who struggle to provide even just the basic necessities for their families. Many families rely on their local food banks as a regular supplemental food source. And of those families, 84 percent of households with children report purchasing the cheapest food available, knowing it wasn’t the healthiest option, in order to provide enough food for their family.

And summertime is probably when food banks need your help the most. That’s because children are on break from school and their families have to provide the meals that they normally would get through school meal programs. Six out of seven low-income kids who eat a free or reduced-price school lunch do not get free meals during the summer because they don’t participate in summer meal programs.

So what can you do to help? Does this mean you should go out and buy a bunch of fruits and vegetables to donate to your local food bank? Or maybe donate some extra produce from your home garden? No. The best way that you can help families in need is to donate money to your local food banks. Food banks have agreements or partnerships with distributors/suppliers so that they are able to stretch your donation dollars to purchase more items, usually in bulk. For example, a one-dollar donation—to a food bank hub like Feeding America—can provide 11 meals to families in need. And 68 percent of the foods distributed are healthy foods that align with the USDA Dietary Guidelines.

At Windermere Real Estate, our offices support local food banks through grants from the Windermere Foundation. Here are just a few of the food banks that we have supported over the past year: Idaho FoodbankColumbia Pacific Food BankSt. Vincent de Paul Food BankMarysville Community Food BankThe People’s PantryRepublic, and Maple Valley Food Bank & Emergency Services.

 

 

If you’d like to help, consider making a donation to the Windermere Foundation or donating directly to your local food bank or food pantry.

 

To learn more about the Windermere Foundation, visit http://www.windermere.com/foundation.

 

 

 

Sources:  feedingamerica.org, nokidhungry.org

Join us this Weekend for Windermere’s Washington Waterfront Home Tour

We’ve found the perfect way for you to kick off summer this year. On June 11 and 12, Windermere is sponsoring the second annual Washington Waterfront Home Tour. More than 95 homes throughout Washington are available for visitors to tour by boat, bike, or car. Properties are priced from $189,000 to $10.4 million. While the homes on the tour are on the water or have views of the water, they’re not all uber expensive; there are properties that fit a wide variety of needs, styles, and budgets.

If you’re wondering about the investment potential of a waterfront home, you should note that sales for these properties have been booming. In the Puget Sound region, the average sales price is up over 10 percent compared to a year ago, and over the past three years, prices have increased by more than 20 percent.*. With the amount of water we have throughout the area, it’s no surprise that waterfront homes are a popular choice, but our strong local economy is doing its part to drive up sales activity and prices.    

A map of the homes and their open house hours can be found here; most will be held open from 1 p.m.-4 p.m. on June 11 and 12. The listing details will note the availability; for those listed as “by appointment only”, contact the agent for a private tour.

Happy hunting!

For more information, go to the Washington Waterfront Home Tour website.

*Source: Northwest Multiple Listing Services

 

A Beginner’s Guide to Managing a Remodel

Browsing photos and ideas can be a fun part of creating your dream room. But making your designs a reality also takes smart planning and organization. Project management is an essential part of remodeling, and there’s nothing like the feeling of implementing a plan to create something new and beautiful. These tips can help you achieve your desired results.

Find a Local Contractor to Create Your Dream Home

 

YourSpace Contractors, original photo on Houzz

 

Become a list writer. Making lists is key when it comes to project management. It’s the only way to properly organize your thoughts and prevent any details from being forgotten.

The most important list is your scope of work, or specifications, document. This is basically a detailed list of everything to be done, from start to finish. If you’re dealing with one main builder who’s organizing all the work, then you’ll need to make sure he or she gets a copy, so the goals are clear and all the information is provided.

Also, having detailed specifications makes it easier if you want to obtain multiple quotes, and you’ll know it’s a fair comparison since all the builders will be quoting using the same criteria.

 

frenchStef Interior Design, original photo on Houzz

 

Make sure you’re all on the same page. If you’re coordinating separate subcontractors (cabinetmaker, plumber, electrician), then it would be worth indicating who’s responsible for each task. Give a complete copy of the specifications to all of them, so they’re all aware of what everyone is doing. Discuss the specifications with your subcontractors since they may be able to provide help and advice. A schedule is also useful, so you can keep track of progress and everyone knows who’s going to be on-site on which day.

With prior knowledge that a partition wall will feature some lighting, for instance, the builders will know to leave the stud frame open for the electrician to run the wires through before it’s boarded up and plastered over. Trying to feed wires through after the fact is much harder, takes longer and risks unnecessary damage.

Sian Baxter Lighting Design, original photo on Houzz

 

Break into subsections. In addition to your main specifications, it’s a good idea to have sublists for each separate element of your design. For example, your main specifications may say “install 6 x recessed LED downlights in ceiling,” but your lighting specifications will detail where they are to be positioned, the type of bulb, the hardware finish and so on. The more information you provide, the more accurate your quote should be and the less likely it will be for mistakes or misunderstandings to occur. It will also minimize any unexpected costs.

This bathroom has a minimalist elegance, but it’s far from straightforward. This project would have required a builder’s spec, including layout and elevation drawings with dimensions, an electrical spec with lighting plan, a plumbing spec with layout drawing, and a decorating spec — phew!

Plan like a pro. Finalize your design before starting any work, rather than trying to do it as you go along. The process will be much more enjoyable without constant deadlines presenting themselves, and if you haven’t planned, you may find your options restricted based on work that’s already taken place.

Take a couple of weeks to put it all together, write your specifications, draw up the plans, get everything ready and make all the decisions before proceeding. This will save you time and money along the way, and significantly reduce stress levels during the project.

This clever design features well-thought-out lighting and custom cabinetry. Careful consideration would have been given to where to position the outlets, radiators, lights, switches and other details.

Yellow Letterbox, original photo on Houzz

 

Never assume. You know the saying. When writing your specifications or drawing your plans, never assume that someone else will know what you want unless you explicitly state it. Include every tiny detail, no matter how picky it may seem. As well as avoiding mistakes, it also prevents any disputes over what is and isn’t included in the quote.

This bathroom just wouldn’t have looked the same if white grout had been used, for instance. You may think it would be absurd to even consider using white grout in this case, but if you haven’t asked for dark gray, you can’t expect it and you can’t assume that you will be asked what color you want. White is standard, and a tiler may use it if nothing has been specified.

Stand by for decisions. Your builder will present many questions and decisions to you along the way. Which tiles do you want on the walls? Where do you want these wall lights? What color do you want on the baseboards?

Your best bet will be to try to pre-empt as many of these decisions as possible and have the answers ready or, even better, provide the information in advance. Making these decisions under pressure can lead to impulse moves you may regret later. However, taking too long could hold up the project, costing you time, money and the patience of your builder. No one wants an unhappy builder.

Inevitably, there will be some questions you couldn’t have anticipated, but if you communicate well with your contractors, they should, where possible, give you time to make a decision without holding up the project. Don’t be afraid to ask their opinion on the best course of action, but don’t feel pressured to compromise on the design if you don’t want to.

Brilliant Lighting, original photo on Houzz

 

Give yourself time to deliver. This is one of the classic pitfalls, so take note. When pulling your design ideas together and deciding which products and materials to use, make a note of the lead times. Many pieces of furniture are made to order and can have lead times of up to 12 weeks, sometimes longer. Similarly, tile and natural stone can take much longer than expected to arrive, and products from abroad can encounter holdups during transit.

This chandelier was custom-made for the project and looks fantastic. This is no last-minute, off-the-shelf, next-day-delivery job. It can be a huge shame if you’ve spent hours, days, weeks choosing the perfect product, but when you come to order it, you find that it will take too long to be delivered, perhaps time you can’t afford. Then you have to decide whether to hold up the work or pick something else based on the fact it can be delivered quickly.

Find a Bathroom Vanity for Your Bath Remodel

Factor in a contingency. Even when you have the very best of intentions, issues that you couldn’t have predicted may arise during your project. So it’s a good idea to factor in a 10 percent contingency within your budget for these matters, especially with old buildings. Who knows what condition the walls are in behind those kitchen cabinets before you rip them out? Or what may be lurking underneath that carpet when you pull it up?

In these situations, it’s important to expect the worst and don’t let it throw you off your game. You are a project manager extraordinaire, and you’ve totally got this. Just accept that these things happen, find out what the options are and make a decision. Your contractors will be able to advise on what to do, so harness their expertise and trust them to help you find the right solution.

Elayne Barre Photography, original photo on Houzz

 

Call in the cavalry. If you choose to manage your project yourself, it’s certainly an enjoyable and rewarding process, but it also takes a certain type of person. You have to be organized, calm under pressure, strategic and confident — not to mention being able to afford the time to plan, coordinate and oversee the work.

If you have qualms about taking it on yourself, then consider hiring a project manager. Yes, there will be a fee, but consider that a badly managed project can cost you time and money, and you may not achieve the results you were after. A pro will take care of everything and allow you to rest easy, knowing you’re in safe hands.

 

By Jennifer Chong, Houzz

Buying Waterfront Properties – What You Should Know Before You Take the Plunge

Living on the Water Is a Lifestyle

Enjoying direct and private access to the water is typically the primary motivator for buyers seeking a waterfront property. As such, it’s really important to consider how you intend to use your waterfront. For example, if you’re a boater, evaluate the moorage at the property. Is the water deep enough for your particular type of boat? Is there a boat lift to keep the boat out of the water when not in use, or do you plan to dry dock for the winter? If you’re a swimmer, is the lakeshore accessible to wade in, or do you have to jump off a dock or platform?  If you have jet skis, sail boats or other water toys, is there a place to store them or moor them? If you’re looking forward to peaceful days on your stand-up paddleboard, is the water in front of your home typically choppy or calm? When you entertain, is there ample parking for guests  or space for visitors to tie up their boats on your dock?

Your directional orientation will also impact your waterfront living experience. East-facing waterfront will allow you to enjoy wonderful sunrises. If you prefer sunsets, west-facing waterfront is preferable. South-facing properties generally enjoy light all day but can also experience more direct weather.

 

Focus on the Property More than the House

The golden rule of real estate, “location, location, location,” is even more true when considering a waterfront property. The ratio of land value to total property value is generally higher in waterfront properties. You can always update and change your home, but you cannot change the location. Consider especially the following features of the property:

  1. View. One of the great perks of being on the water is enjoying the beautiful views. Understand if your view is protected by CC&Rs or view easements. If there are any view-obstructing trees or structures, identify whose property they are on and your ability to maintain your view.
  2. Proximity to the Water. If the home is not close to the shoreline, consider how you’ll access the water. If you plan to entertain lakeside, think about how you’ll get food, beverages and supplies down to the waterfront easily.
  3. Privacy. The property’s feeling of privacy usually corresponds to its waterfront frontage. The larger your waterfront frontage, the more buffer you’ll have from your neighbors.
  4. Topography of the Land. Is the waterfront property on a level lot or a steep slope? Access to the water is easier on a flat lot – many lakefront lots are steep and can be difficult to get up and down to. Again, this impacts the value of the property

 

Understand What You Can and Can’t Do with the Property

Waterfront properties are subject to additional regulations and codes from various local, state and federal agencies. There are very strict regulations on shoreline development. If the property requires a new dock or bulkhead, it’s important to know that this can be a very challenging process given the multiple government agencies involved. These limitations are likely to get even more restrictive in the near future as the shoreline regulations are being updated. Sooner is better than later in applying for any permits related to docks, bulkheads and changes to the shoreline.

Finally, if you’re planning to build or significantly remodel, do a thorough feasibility analysis given city codes and shoreline regulations. New construction often cannot be built as close to the water as the existing structure under current code. In addition to meeting with the city, engage an architect and builder who have significant experience building waterfront properties in your area to help advise you about what likely limitations there are on your particular parcel.

 

Every Waterfront Property Is Unique – Learn the Nuances

Living on the water means that you have an additional set of factors to consider concerning your waterfront experience. For example, what is the boating traffic like in front of your home? Is it a busy channel or near a favorite fishing spot where boaters tend to congregate? Look closely at the properties of your waterfront neighbors: is there a tear-down next door so there will likely be a construction barge in front of you for the next few years? Does your neighbor have a huge yacht moored all summer that blocks your view? Is there a public beach nearby or community club that will cause noise late into the evenings?

If you’re considering shared waterfront, be especially thorough in understanding your rights and ownership interests. Some shared waterfront properties have a specifically deeded boat slip, though many others share an interest in a community dock. The system for moorage assignment and rotation can often lead to contention among neighbors, so it’s important to learn as much as you can about how the shared waterfront and is handled in your neighborhood.

There is a reason that owning a waterfront home is a life-long dream for so many people – it brings an extraordinary lifestyle. As a significant financial investment and very unique type of real estate, it’s especially critical to engage professionals who understand the complex issues inherent in waterfront properties. Equipped with the right expertise, guidance and knowledge, you’ll be ready to turn to your waterfront dream into a reality.  

 

Windermere's second annual Washington Waterfront Home Tour on June 11-12 features nearly 100 properties statewide, ranging in price from $189,000 to $10.4 Million. To learn more about the event and featured properties go to www.waterfronthomeswa.com 

 

Kelley Weisfield is a long-term resident of Seattle and the Eastside. She works out of the Windermere Real Estate Mercer Island office, ideal for cultivating opportunities for buyers and sellers around Lake Washington. Kelley worked as an attourney for 11 year before she made the switch to real estate more than 13 years ago. 

 

 

Photos by Michaelo Walmsley, Forest Ave Photos 

What is the Case-Schiller Home Price Report and why does it Matter?

The S&P/Case-Shiller Home Price Indices is a monthly report that analyzes housing data in major metropolitan areas across the U.S. Windermere’s Chief Economist, Matthew Gardner explains what this report is and why we use it to assess the strength of the housing market. 

 

Windermere’s Annual Community Service Day Is today!

 

Today you may notice your local Windermere office is closed, or it may take a little bit longer for your Windermere agent to get back to you. But we promise it’s for a very good reason: today is Windermere Community Service Day. Since 1984, our agents have taken one day a year off to dig into hands-on community service projects throughout the Western U.S. On this day, you’ll find our teams doing a variety of projects, such as cleaning, landscaping, and painting at local senior citizens centers, facilities for homeless children and adults, public parks and schools, low-income housing, and emergency shelters, among others.

Follow what our offices are doing on Community Service Day on Facebook! You can also vote for your favorite Community Service Day photos in our #WindermereCSD2016  photo contest. The photo with the most votes will receive a $1,000 donation for the Windermere Foundation charity of their choice. Go here to vote. We encourage you to “like” our Facebook page, follow the Community Service Day projects, and vote for your favorite Community Service Day photos!

A big thank you to all of our Windermere Real Estate offices for the amazing work they do. Community Service Day is an important part of what makes Windermere the place it is, and we appreciate everything they do to make our communities a little better.

Community Service Day Projects:

  Office Organization Project
California    
  Carlsbad San Diego Ronald McDonald House Ice Cream Social for patients & families 
  Diablo Realty B Walker Ranch Building garden boxes, planting olive trees, conditioning the soil, creating signage on the property, painting the alpaca barn, and caring for the alpacas.
  El Sobrante, Brentwood and Diablo B Walker Ranch  Help set up new location grounds for incoming campers
  Morgan Hill Morgan Hill Senior Center Building maintenance, administrative support and lunch with seniors.
 
  Walnut Creek Contra Costa & Solano Food Bank Collecting and sorting food for the local food bank
Colorado      
  Fort Collins The Murphy Center Sharing donuts, muffins and coffee with homeless community members and assisting with building maintenance; cleaning windows, organizing gear and making bags for the Street Outreach Program. 
Hawaii      
  Kailua-Kona Supporting local neighbor with home projects Managing yard maintenance and other home projects for local single mom with stage 4 breast cancer
Montana      
  Bozeman Springmeadows Assisted Living Throwing a beach party for the elderly residents
  Helena Lewis & Clark Humane Society  General maintenance 
Oregon      
  Bend Healing Reins, Bend, Oregon Working on the arenas and grounds of Healing Reins. Painting, pulling weeds and organizing tack rooms etc.
  Bridgeport/Charbonneau Community Warehouse Landscaping and additional maintenance work
  Cannon Beach Gearhart Kids- local children’s center Installing a mud kitchen, burying tires, building boxes for gardening - and what ever else they need
  Corvallis/Albany Benton County Habitat for Humanity Working on construction (framing and installing sub-floor) of a home for Habitat for Humanity.
  Eugene Food for Lane County Grassroots Garden Harvest and clean up the entire garden with over 75 volunteers
  Gearhart Gearhart Kids- local children’s center Installing a mud kitchen, burying tires, building boxes for gardening - and what ever else they need
  Grants Pass & Rogue River Hearts with a Mission, Josephine County Outside work: Cleaning up property which includes knocking down long grass and weeds and cleaning up.
Inside work: Cleaning furniture and facility, as directed by program director.
  Hillsboro/Sunset Corridor The Pantry Pressure washing the delivery truck, washing out food crates, cleaning aisle shelves, painting the waiting room, and cleaning freezer shelves
  Hood River & Bingen Local Food Bank Organize & execute a food drive to help local families
  Kelso/Longview Salvation Army and North Lake Elementary
  Lake Oswego- Stellar Tualatin School House Pantry Working at a local Food Bank, helping prep food and dry goods for transport
  Lake Oswego- West Oregon Food Bank Sorting dried goods for redistribution at the Oregon Food Bank in Beaverton. 
  Lane County Lane County Food Bank Volunteering at Food for Lane County's Grassroots Garden
  Medford, Eagle Point, Jacksonville & Ashland Access Food Bank Collecting bags of food donations 
  Mill Plains Fruit Valley Foundation Food Bank & Local Meals on Wheels Month-long food collection  & serving local members of the community through the meals on wheels program
  Portland Heights Project Lemonade Merchandising a store front that serves foster youth for back to school clothing
  Portland- Hollywood Oregon Humane Society  All agents and employees in our office have donated money and pet supplies for the Oregon Humane Society
  Portland- Lloyd Tower Friends of the Children  Setting up for Fundraising event
  Portland- Moreland Human Solutions Groundskeeping
  Portland- North Astor Elementary School Cleaning up the school grounds, weeding, laying bark dust, trimming trees and plants
  Portland- NW Johnson White Shield Garden Property maintenance & organization
  Portland- Raleigh Hills Hopewell House Weeding and pruning beds, planting flowers and improving the appearance of the pathways, grounds and fountain for hospice residents, their families and visitors to enjoy.
  Redmond Bright Side Animal Center Working at the Thrift Shop that supports Brightside Animal Center
  Salem City of Salem Parks Working at Riverfont Park. Prepping and painting decorative railing and tending to flowerbeds.
  Sandy Oregon Department of Transportation (ODOT) Adopt A Road program Collect litter along highway 26, a three-mile strip of roadway in Sandy, Oregon.
  Seal Rock Seashore Family Literacy Center Improving and maintaining the JOY GARDEN at the Seashore Family Literacy Center
  St. Helens/Scappoose Columbia River food bank Fundraise and collect food and other supplies for the local food bank
  Stevenson City-wide downtown cleanup
  The Dalles & Property Management- Gorge The Dalles Mainstreet Downtown core clean up
  Vancouver Metro Fruit Valley Foundation Food Bank & Local Meals on Wheels Serving meals for Meals on Wheels at 4 of their locations in Clark County & doing a month-long food drive to benefit the Fruit Valley Foundation 
  West Linn West Linn Adult Community Center Helping with landscaping, cleaning and other projects at the West Linn Adult Community Center
Utah      
  Salt Lake City Salt Lake Somali Refugee Community  Laying sod, repairing fences, building a play ground and some back yard furniture, planting a garden and more to help transform a local home and community meeting space for the Salt Lake City Somali Refugee Community
Washington    
  Aberdeen The Driftwood Playhouse Cleaning and organizing the costume storage rooms at local live theatre venue
  Alderwood Red Barn Community Farm Preparing garden beds for summer crops
  Ballard Saint Luke's Church Revamp kitchen & dining area to serve larger homeless population and beautify outdoor areas
  Bellevue Kelsey Creek Farm Gardening, weeding, yard cleanup, and painting.
  Bellevue Commons Little Bit Therapeutic Riding Center Painting the caretaker’s home (the whole house!), taking care of rain garden maintenance, weed whacking, and washing windows. The brokers will also be washing the horses’ paddock fencing and arena fencing as well as making repairs.
  Bellevue-South Mountains to Sound Greenway Restoration of the Sunset Beach area at Lake Sammamish State Park
  Bellevue-West Evergreen Court Removing ivy and blackberries, washing windows, power washing, and painting
  Capitol Hill City of Seattle  Cleaning up trash on 9 different busy streets, including two on and off ramps in the Capitol Hill neighborhood, and picking up trash and cleaning up the sidewalks
  Coupeville National Park Service/ Prairie Wayside Park Cleaning graffiti, painting, pruning hedges, scraping moss, clearing paths, picking up trash and beautifying this little gem of a park
  Edmonds Edmonds City Park At the Edmonds Marsh removing noxious Japanese knot weed
  Green Lake Local Neighbor Support Help local families with needed maintenance projects
  Greenwood Phinney Center Working with elderly families on yard projects
  Issaquah YMCA's Camp Terry Clearing trails, depositing wood chips into play areas, staining new bleachers and picnic tables around the stage and fire pit, and building a large platform for camp-goers to play games.
  Kirkland- Central McAuliffe Park Local park cleanup
  Kirkland- Northeast Attain Housing Half the group will be painting and doing yard work while the other half cleans and organizes their office
  Kirkland- Yarrow Bay Heritage Park  Landscape cleanup, view restoration, path cleaning, and weed removal.
  Lori Gill & Associates/ Property Management offices Camp Korey
  Madison Park Washington Park Arboretum Clean up
  Magnolia Community support event Hosting  a shredding, eCycle and Goodwill donation event
  Marysville Marysville Historical Society Museum Landscaping grounds of new museum
  Mercer Island Eastside Baby Corner Cleaning, sorting and prepping the baby items to be delivered that day to Eastside Baby Corner
  Mount Baker Wellspring Family Services Helping out in the Baby Boutique
  Mukilteo Mukilteo Food Bank Collect food for local food bank. Last year they collected more than 2,000 pounds of food.
  Oak Harbor Habitat for Humanity Aiding in the construction of a new duplex, including framing the ground floor,  landscaping and community garden support
  Professional Partners (Tacoma) Northwest Furniture Bank Helping out in their warehouse and loading and unloading trucks full of furniture and household goods
  Professional Partners (Tacoma) Liberty Road Foundation Helping them organize their fundraising retail store 
  Professional Partners (Tacoma) Purdy-area resident Helping an elderly resident without the resources to move personal belongings to new residence 
  Professional Partners (Tacoma) Key Peninsula area  Helping an elderly couple with necessary yard and home maintenance
  Property Management Kent Northwest Harvest Kent Warehouse Helping with food sorting for area food bank
  Pullman/Moscow Whitman County Human Society Pulling weeds, mowing lawns, doing deep clean outs, scrubbing walls and much more
  Queen Anne Food drive and making individual bag lunches for the Queen Anne Helpline Dropping bags at homes May 30 and 31; picking up and bagging lunches on June 3.
Covering the surrounding Queen Anne area of the office. 
  Redmond YWCA Family Village  Planting flowers, painting stripes in the parking lot, power washing the porches, labeling supplies, and more.
  Renton Emergency Feeding Program Cleaning up the warehouse and helping them organize the bags of food for delivery to their distribution partners.
  Sand Point NEST (North East Seattle Together) Helping six elderly families/individuals with home maintenance, including window washing, weeding, trimming bushes, removing moss and other home maintenance projects
  Seattle Property Management Green Seattle Partnership & Weekday Workers Forest Restoration at Carkeek Park
  Seattle Services & Marketing Magnuson YMCA Indoor and outdoor maintenance programs in preparation for summer programs
  Sequim East & Sunland Boys & Girls Clubs of the Olympic Peninsula Car wash fundraiser
  Shoreline North Helpline Sorting and boxing food for the food bank
  Spokane Annual Windermere Marathon/ Foundation Fundraiser
  Vashon Island Granny's Attic Clean and organize the local thrift shop. This store donates profits to local area nonprofits.
  Wall Street Mary’s Place  At the Travel Lodge near Seattle Center that was donated by Amazon.
Painting, cleaning, landscaping and getting rooms ready for new families.
  Wedgwood Wedgwood Community Council Mowing, edging, weeding and hauling away debris of public space
  West Seattle Single family residence  Painting, planting and landscaping
  Woodinville Park at Bothell Landing General maintenance and cleanup of the parks next to the Sammamish River to prep the Landing for summer crowds